Posted by on October 13, 2021 8:01 pm
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Yale Epidemiology Prof: ‘Natural Immunity is Much Longer-Lasting Than Vaccinated Immunity’
Yale professor Dr. Harvey Risch gives a lecture on pancreatic cancer. (Photo credit: YouTube/Yale Cancer Center)

A Yale University epidemiology professor at Yale University said that natural immunity is needed “to combat other viruses, other strains [of coronavirus] that may be coming as well. And for longer-lasting protection, natural immunity is much longer lasting that vaxxed immunity” on “The Ingraham Angle” Tuesday. 

Dr. Harvey Risch discussed the importance of natural, or herd, immunity with Fox News host Laura Ingraham, explaining how the lifespan of immunity to COVID from a vaccine is much shorter than if someone gains natural immunity. 

“The vaccine immunity has a finite lifespan of somewhere between three and six months and it’s losing that over time, and more people are getting infected again.” 

 

Below is a transcript of this segment from “The Ingraham Angle”:

Laura Ingraham: “So if vaccines are really the ticket back to normalcy, why is Singapore, where 83 percent of the population is fully vaxxed, in the midst of another COVID wave? Meanwhile in Scandinavia, life is essentially back to normal: no mandates, vax passports, masks, everything’s open. Despite a much lower vaccination rate, places like Denmark are averaging fewer than one COVID death a day. 

“So what’s going on? My next guest has some ideas. Dr. Harvey Risch, Yale epidemiology professor, joins me now. Dr. Risch, what is going on here? It’s confusing to average Americans.”

Dr. Harvey Risch: “Well, Singapore has done very well, very thorough, at vaccinating its population, but the population has very little natural immunity. Hardly anybody got the infection in the first place and now the vaccines are wearing off. The vaccine immunity has a finite lifespan of somewhere between three and six months and it’s losing that over time, and more people are getting infected again. 

“People can get infected while the vax is working fully, but they’re relatively protected from very severe outcomes, which is a good thing, by and large, for the people who take it. But they really need much more natural immunity from the infection going forward, in order to prevent what they’re seeing. And they need that natural immunity to combat other viruses, other strains that may be coming as well. And for longer-lasting protection, natural immunity is much longer lasting that vaxxed immunity.”

Ingraham: “You mean the natural immunity that our own government claims isn’t really protective at all? OK. Well a big problem, professor, doctor, that Singapore has is its own mixed messaging from their leader. Watch.” 

[Video from Singapore’s Prime Minister’s Office on Saturday]

Lee Hsien Loong: “Cut back on social activities to slow the spread of the virus. Get vaccinated if you haven’t already done so.… Go for your booster shot when your turn comes…. As more people are exposed to the virus and recover, our immunity levels will increase. COVID will spread less quickly among us.”

Ingraham: “OK, so two different things Dr. Risch. So it seems that outside of Scandinavia, none of these leaders know what they’re doing. I mean, they just simply don’t realize that locking down prolonged the pandemic for most of these countries. Period.”

Risch: “That’s true. But he said it, he said as more people get the virus, more [unintelligible] open up.…”

Ingraham: “At the end. Yeah, that’s after he flip-flopped early on so they didn’t happen exactly at the same time. But herd immunity is a real thing, yes or no, Dr. Risch?”

Risch: “Yes, absolutely. Natural immunity is a real thing in large scale. We have about 70 percent now in the United States and it’s increasing over time, absolutely.” 

Ingraham: “Alright, well I have herd immunity to a hard break. Dr. Risch, thank you.”

Megan Williams is a CNSNews intern and junior at Hillsdale College. She is majoring in Rhetoric and Public Address with a Journalism minor. She is the assistant opinions editor for the Hillsdale Collegian and enjoys covering local events, from concerts to conventions. Born and raised in Southern California, Megan is excited to experience D.C. and grow as a journalist with CNSNews.

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