Posted by on June 21, 2022 6:34 pm
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Chicago police place limits on foot pursuits

US Amerikanisches Sheriff-Polizeiauto mit gelbem Absperrband “Police line do not cross”. (iStock)

Chicago police place limits on foot pursuits

Misty Severi June 21, 05:59 PMJune 21, 05:59 PM Video Embed

The Chicago Police Department unveiled a policy Tuesday that prohibits officers from pursuing suspects of minor offenses on foot or if people simply run away.

The new policy comes a year after police fatally shot 13-year-old Adam Toledo and 22-year-old Anthony Alvarez during separate chases last year, which were followed by a call from Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot for reforms on such pursuits.

FOUR DEAD AFTER 47 PEOPLE SHOT IN CHICAGO OVER THE WEEKEND

“The safety of our community members and our officers remain at the core of this new foot pursuit policy,” Superintendent David Brown said in a statement. “We collaborated internally with our officers and externally with our residents to develop a policy we all have a stake in.”

Under the new policy, officers cannot chase anyone in connection to minor offenses such as a parking violation, driving on a suspended license, or drinking in public. However, they are still allowed to pursue those suspected of committing a serious traffic offense such as driving under the influence and street racing, along with those suspected of committing a Class A misdemeanor such as domestic battery or a felony.

The decision on whether to pursue a suspect is still the responsibility of officers, including whether they believe the suspect poses a threat to public safety. However, the policy outlines some instances in which officers would need to stop pursuing a suspect, including stopping the pursuit if someone is injured, if the officers are unable to communicate with other officers, or if they no longer know where they are located.

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Other major cities, including Portland, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, have already implemented similar foot pursuit policies.

The new policy in Chicago will go into effect by the end of the summer, allowing officers to receive proper training under the new orders, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

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