Posted by on August 5, 2022 4:37 pm
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Minnesota police officer saves four children after breaking into burning building

fire isolated over black background (Olga Miltsova/Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Minnesota police officer saves four children after breaking into burning building

Jenny Goldsberry August 05, 03:59 PMAugust 05, 03:59 PM Video Embed

The Saint Paul Police Department shared a story on Facebook Friday about an officer who saved four children from a burning building.

Officer Bill Beaudette, the most senior officer in the department with 29 years of experience, was patrolling when he noticed smoke. Beaudette followed the smoke until he found a duplex on Case Avenue and Forest Street on fire, police said.

“After calling for Saint Paul Fire Department personnel, Officer Beaudette rushed to the home to make sure no one was inside. The duplex was full of smoke,” the post read. “Officer Beaudette was able to help a resident from the upper unit get outside. But when he knocked on the door to the lower unit, there was no answer. Officer Beaudette couldn’t confirm the unit was unoccupied and didn’t want to take any chances. He kicked the door open and found four children inside, ages ranging from three to seven years old.”

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All four children were evacuated and promptly reunited with their father. The St. Paul Fire Department arrived soon after and put out the fire.

“Officers don’t get to choose calls. These calls choose the officers,” the post read. “Officer Beaudette was in the right place, at the right time, and was able to change the course of this event for this family.”

“Thank you for saving my granddaughters’ lives officer Beaudette!!” one user, Alice Cornelius, commented on the post.

Beaudette is a recipient of the Richard H. Rowan Award, which is awarded to an officer who exemplifies legacy, leadership, integrity, courage, and innovation.

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Fires kill about 500 children age 14 and under nationwide each year, according to Stanford Medicine Children’s Health.

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